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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,295 (some duplicates have been removed)
portion of the program will be moderated by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 14 when his family emigrated from cuba under harrowing circumstances, including last minute detention by the secret police. he made it here. in two lines -- and two lines come to mind when i think of him. "this is my country, land of my choice. this is my country, here i found voice." what a voice it is. he earned his aba at the university of florida and he is now in their hall of fame. he is a partner in the miami office of the national law firm. his clients range from former vice president al gore to philip morris, to the nation
developments. we expect to hear confirmation from authorities in 5 to 10 minutes. we are hearing from a law enforcement official telling fox that the boy, the 5-year-old boy who has been held in the under ground bunker in the area you see behind me coming up on 7 days, that he has been released and that he is, quote, okay. the same law enforcement official also saying that the suspect, 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes who had been -- allegedly holding this boy in his backyard bunker all this time, that the suspect in the case is dead. kimberly, all of this began last tuesday afternoon. the boy was riding home on a school bus in this neighborhood, in this area where i am when a gunman boarded the bus, the bus driver positioned himself between the gunman and the children. the gunman opened fire fatally wounding mr. poland and one of the children was taken hostage. that child being that 5-year-old brought to a backyard bunker in the backyard of this suspect jimmy lee dykes, a 65-year-old who neighbors describe as very territorial someone who would become violent if neighbors or even a dog would ven
up in three weeks in toronto at our annual meeting. it tells people going to law school exactly what they are in for and you need to understand that the accreditation part of the american bar association is under a completely separate organization as a result of an agreement we have with the department of justice and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you ha
and administrative law and sometimes property, sometimes local government law. >> when you approached the affairs or said the manuscript to a publisher, was the answer back from public affairs and why were they interested in the story? >> well, fortunately i already had a relationship from my first book about the book that's title to the integration why we still study to be in emigrated society. so i had a relationship with them and i sent a proposal to them i think they knew i was a fairly tenacious person, and they also found the story compelling. so thank you, public affairs. >> just a short conversation with george on professor sheryll cashin about her second book, "the agitators' daughter a memoir of four generations of an extraordinary african american family." by the way, booktv covered the professor earlier on this book and it's about one hour in length. you can go to booktv.org and type in her name and you can watch the entire hour. thanks for being with us. >> sarah gordon talks about religious cases in history that have transformed the law of the country and dominated protection in the
king. >> a whopper of a [eagle caw] >> stephen: tonight, do states have to follow federal law? only if it starts with "simon says." bailiff lf. [ laughter ] then, what's the latest news in the war on terror? the answer is redacted. [ laughter ] and my guest george saunders wrote what the new york times called "the best book you'll read this year." joke's on them, i'm not reading any books this year. [ laughter ] eating lunch earlier can help you lose weight. that's why i always eat tomorrow's lunch tonight. [ laughter ] captioning sponsored by comedy central this is "the colbert report." ["the colbert report" theme music playing] [cheers and applause] welcome to the broadcast, everybody. thank you so much. [cheers and applause] [crowd chanting stephen b.c. [ thank you, ladies and gentlemen. [cheers and applause] thank so much. please, nation, heros sit down. welcome to the broadcast, coming to you, as always, in bone-jostling sensurround! [ laughter ] a lot of technology. [ laughter ] nation, for years i've been warning you about iran. they're almost as big a threat as our other ene
. thank you for joining us. >> great to be here. longtime fan. did you know? [laughter] against the law. just a warning this time. [ laughter ] >> jon: cuff it it's the fuzz. how are you? thanks for joining us. i want to talk about two things. we don't have a ton of time because obviously you are fighting crime. the first thing is going to be guns. there's a huge discussion on guns in this country right now. but it seems like there are lobby groups and advocacy groups, not a lot of law enforcement, seems like they should be the focus of discussion rather than not. is there a reason for that the? is law enforcement not allowed or permitted to take a public stand on what they might favor for gun issue? >> the think the big organizations have been speaking out about it. you saw the president yesterday in minnesota with a group of police officers. so i think parts are engaged, maybe not speak as loud as we could. chuck ram si has been the head of agency has been articulate and outspoken. law enforcement has a personal concern about guns and gun safety. police officers, over 150 a year. >> j
are lawful immigrants. so any way you cut it, it's going to have a huge impact. some of the -- and there's a lot in here for everyone. employers, students who came here at a young age. they're called dreamers. agricultural workers. some of the things that people may not be aware of, in the president's proposal, lgbt families will be able to sponsor their family members. >> and that's from the president's proposal but not in the so-called gang of eight. >> it's not in the gang of eight proposal. but i think one of other issues for californians to, in terms of watching this debate and participating in it, is to understand what the road blocks are. because it's not just smooth sailing. there's a lot of concern about high fines for low-income immigrants. the requirements such as civics and english. even before you can get a green card. those are requirements we have for people who can become citizens. not for getting a green card. and the biggest thing is getting in the back of the line, because our legal immigration system is to backlogged. right now people who've sponsored someone, a sibli
now. >> monica says without leadership, this money mess is getting worse. >> well, who needs the law. the law dictates that the president is supposed to submit a budget by a certain date, today, and fourth year in a row no budget. >> let's roll this out of neil. this is neil just five months ago. can we play that? take a listen. >> it does seem a bestbit ironic that we have, according to the united states treasurery, eclipsed a $16 trillion debt level collectively what we owe as nation now going over $16 trillion. >> that was five months ago. five months ago we spent 500 billion -- half a trillion dollars. >> it's amazing. this president has committed budgets over the last couple of years but each one has been so obscene that he can't even get a single democrat to vote for his budget. so, whatever he proposed -- we talk about today's legal deadline. whatever he proposes is going to be so ludicrous that even members of his own party won't go along with it. every president since the end of world war ii of both parties has usually kept federal spending as a percentage of gdp between 18
company -- >> the rule of law isn't really the rule of law if it doesn't apply equally to everybody. i mean, if you're going to put somebody in jail for having a joint is his pocket, you can't let higher ranking hsbc officials off for laundering $800 million for the worst drug dealers in the entire world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert
prem at mukherjee -- pranab mukherjee signed a new law. i realize there are lots of reporting restrictions. what do we actually know about the events in court today? >> as you mentioned, only one witness took the stand. he was the key prosecution witness, the male friend of the young woman who was gang raped and then murdered last december. he was brought here in a wheelchair. he, too, received injuries during that attack, allegedly at the hands of the five men charged in woman's murder and gang rape. also at the court, apart from the five men, the bus where the attack took place was driven into the complex. the entire day was taken up with the prosecution prove -- presenting their key witness. the court will convene tomorrow morning. the defense will get their chance to cross-examine this witness. he is the first of about 80 witnesses the prosecution is expected to field, including police officers, forensic experts, and doctors, who did their best to try to save the young woman's life. >> this whole case takes place against a backdrop in which the government, if you like, is
feelings rather than by the law. i can't tell you how many times when i was a lawyer and sometimes even now you read an opinion below and you say "what's motivating this?" is it the law or a person feeling? >> rose: what's the danger here? >> the danger is that you think of judges as computers, which we are not. we are human beings with strengths and weaknesses with limit takes in our life experiences. you want us to be aware of both those things. the good and the bad, the biases and the prejudices so that we actually work consciously at not letting them influence our outcomes. that we don't assume that we're right about our biases. that we don't assume that we're not human beings unaffected by our emotions. and that we work hard. >> rose: associate justice sonia sotomayor for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: associate justice sonia sotomayor is here. she made history in 2009 when she became the first hispanic and the third woman to sit on the supreme court. her story embodies the american dream. sh
, and chuck grassley of iowa, a republican, are outraged that the giant banks violate the law with impunity -- laundering money, cheating homeowners, falsifying information -- every trick in the ledger book. they sent a letter to attorney general eric holder demanding to know why the banks get away with fines instead of jail time. maybe they had their anger roiled by "frontline," public television's premier investigative series. the other night, "frontline" broadcast a report called "the untouchables," on how the department of justice allegedly has looked the other way for fear that prosecuting the banks would do even more damage to the american economy. >> it was a definite sense that justice backed off. >> did the government fail? >> a number of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to return to priva
communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is
ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays
pressure on law makers. tom joins us now. this trip expected to be the first of many. >> the administration's goal is to build on what it sees as momentum following last week's hearing on gun control. supporters of the president's plan say time is important. they want to hold on to the public's attention. gun rights advocates say is they saw a rush to pass new gun laws in their view has eased. >> president obama led a round table in an effort to rewrite gun laws. >> which don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. >> that something includes 23 gun control proposals the president endorsed after the school shooting. limiting ammunition clips and expanding background checks. >> we're not going to save every life but we can make a difference. and that's our responsibility as americans. >> but the head of the nra says instead of limiting gun use by people who follow the law, shouldwork to end laws that allow mentally unstable people to buy guns. >> they won't do it. the hppa laws won't do it. we're all for it. but it's not. >> over the weekend is a lead up to the presi
, and i would like to also thank law enforcement for coming into the tenderloin district more often. i really appreciate the hard core law enforcement and i'm asking for more. please fit that into the budget, it is a must. that district is really bad. i know it's not the only district, but the need for more hard core law enforcement is a must. black crime is all over the tenderloin district. drugs are being sold and used in the streets everywhere. remember my paperwork that i gave to you in september 2012 requesting major sting operations. please refer to that paperwork again because i hit the nail on the head with that. and i really thank you very much for backing that up. i would also like to see law enforcement down in that district 24/7 and that's where the budget comes in because i would also like to see hard core tactical law enforcement 24/7. the district needs tough action. all crime must be stopped. bring in law enforcement that is tough on crime. stop and frisk is a must, it must happen. these criminals are holding drugs, money, weapons, et cetera, et cetera. crime must be st
of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this issue. a five minute presentation is not sufficient to that and my colleague will speak on the details of this. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you m
the sunshine ordinance task force says, we're not going to do it. we don't care what the law says; we're not going to do it and when it's referred over here, up until this effort op your part to actually enforce it, none more enforced that jul gomez which was basically ignored by the mayor. basically what we're talking about here is denial of due process. the law san francisco gives the citizens the right whente it they have been deadline the opportunity to make public comment, the avenue of going to the sunshine ordinance task force and asking for their assistance. but what good does to do you? you go there and get the orders of determination, and yet, other city agencies including this body, just ignore those determinations. know your rights under the sunshine ordinance is printed on every agenda of every commission and board in this city and every meeting. and yet when people who actually do know their rights under the sunshine ordinance and come before the bodies and simply ask to have their constitutional rights respected, for heaven's sake, they get met with open hostility.
of what exactly is going on. we were able to confirm with a federal law enforcement official that the small aerial aircraft that we've been seeing kind of circling the property in the morning, that that was a surveillance aircraft. so that's what we've been seeing the last few days, and again police have been very tight-lipped and haven't said exactly what they have been finding or what the location -- or what the layout of dykes' property has been. >> gabe gutierrez, thank you so much. sorry -- you need to stay there, sorry, gabe. i wanted to ask you one more question concerning the bus driver. charles poland, who was laid to rest. he's being hailed as something of a hero because he was approached by the individual suspect and shot defending the other children on the bus. >> reporter: that's exactly right, martin. he's been hailed as a hero by this community. his funeral was yesterday. spoke of him as being a hero for getting in front of the suspect and for taking a bullet and giving his life essentially for these children. he protected more than 20 kids who were on this bus
in the school space and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an alternate reality or something separate or add on that the school and the school context is what we're really talking about here and that is 90% of their waking hours. that's their social life. >> and one of the reasons that a lot of researchers and nonprofits don't like the term "cyber bull" and it's about the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use
than by the law. i can't tell you how many times when i was a lawyer and sometimes even now you read a opinion below andou say "what's motiving this?" is it the law or a person feeling? >> rose: what's the danger here? >> the danger is that you think of judges as computers, which we are not. we are human beings with strengths and weaknesses with limit takes in our life experiences. you want us to be aware of both those things. the good and the bad, the biases and the prejudices so that we actually work consciously at not letting them influence our outcomes. that we don't assume that we're right about our biases. that we don't assume that we're not human beings unaffected by our emotions. and that we work hard. >> rose: associate justice sonia sotomayor for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: associate justice sonia tomayor is here. she made history in 2009 when she became the first hispanic and the third woman to sit on the supreme court. her story embodies the american dream. she grew up in a p
to find out exactly what happened. >> we've also been watching pictures of what appeared to be fbi and law enforcement sort of high-fiving as if some kind of conclusion had actually happened. we're seeing pictures now. did you observe them? did you hear anything that they were saying? >> reporter: well, we are quite a long distance away. if you can see behind me. those pictures were taken from our camera position with a zoom pretty much all the way on. but that's the dirt road leading up to the bunker. right now it's jimmy dykes' property. we did see some law enforcement officials shaking hands and high-fiving. however, you know, that seems to suggest that there might be some sort of positive outcome here, but again we just don't know that at this point and we don't want to speculate on what exactly happened, but it does seem to suggest that it could be a positive outcome. again, we don't want to speculate. >> i need to report to you, gabe, that our justice correspondent pete williams is reporting that a law enforcement official says initial reports are that the kidnapper in alabama is dea
sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle th
has become inefficient. law enforcement needs to be one component along with courts and treatment programs and reentry program in preventing drug abuse and with crime and family break down. this is way from [inaudible] focusing on dealers. there are law enforcement alternatives for the sfpd to consider. i wanted to mention one and a pilot program in seattle washington that could be used as an alternative and small time drug dealers are deterred into community services rather than jail. the approach has been successful in the united kingdom. whether african-americans deal drugs at 18 times of the population or seven times the rate in other cities is maybe increasingly irrelevant. the gap of what race gets arrested from selling drugs and what race dies from using drugs is significant and requires a balanced approach and the city needs to transition to policies reducing drug abuse. over the past decade san francisco law enforcement has prioritizing arresting drug dealers over consumers and focus on the drug dealing likely done by minorities. the choices have not searched san fr
suspension of the tobacco sales permit. the reason for suspension, violation of state law and the san francisco health code which proprohibit the indoor smoking of tobacco products. director's case no. smk12-09 and we'll start with the appellant. you have seven minutes >> good evening, my name is bashir shahin, the owner of marrakech restaurant. thank you to the board of appeals for giving us a chance to express our thoughts and feelings. i am not here to argue or ask for anything unreasonable. just hoping that you will give us some leniency andtry to give us some mercy on this case, which is a small family business, trying to keep our doors open. we have been in business for the last 16 years. i have clean record with all departments. for the last few years we have been hit very hard by the recession and economy and it's been hard to keep our doors as well. we like to comply with the ordinance, with any laws that come through. just this particular matter is kind of confusing and that is why we got into this argument. and we're hoping to resolve it and get better results from this.
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
will give an overview of the gun laws in the state of california. >> good evening, commissioners, chief, director. thank you very much, i'm dennis oleary from the chief's office. first i would like to let you know that the question was what are the four more commonly enforced gun laws in san francisco? and now, commissioner mazzucco they have changed the laws and the numbers are different. so what used to be like 12025, and 12031 is now a new series. but any way, the most common guns are carrying concealed with firearm and carrying a loaded firearm, someone that is prohibited from carrying a gun is caught carrying a gun and then carrying a stolen gun and that is what the 496 charge is. and california has like angela was saying, has some of the most restrictive gun laws in the state that makes it and it is difficult to buy a gun, where people have to in california, the firearms dealer has to be licensed and there is background checks and ten-day waits. that has been standard for many years. and there are limits on how many guns can be purchased and it goes on about the record keeping and
gun sales and he was going to address that by removing some barriers in health laws that prevent some states from making the information available to people that need it. he would go about improving centers for states to share information within the system and making sure that all of the federal agencies are talking with each other. and he would also make sure that his ag would be talking with the federal law enforcement agencies. and it goes on where his plan, you know, goes into the assault weapon ban. and he called for it to be reinstated and to be strengthened. and the one that this nation had expired in 2004 and also, he directs some of his action toward us, toward the police. as far as getting rid of the armor piercing bullets and giving us tools to prevent and prosecute gun crimes he calls for more school resource officers and more counselors in the schools and he asks that the nation assure that youngsters that people that are 16 and 25 years old are the ones that where the mental illness appears in us. and also, that is the same age group that is less likely to ask for help.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,295 (some duplicates have been removed)